Nov
11

“This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave.”

Join us in honoring the men and women who protect our freedoms by daily risking—and sometimes losing—everything. These are their memorials. But remember, we honor our veterans most by honoring the ideals they fought for.

 

American Flag

 

“As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”

—John Fitzgerald Kennedy

All photography by Eric Long, Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. “I guess memorials can be designated for both those who died and those who served. I began producing postcards of the memorials three years ago as a way to give back to the veteran community through my photography.”

World War II Memorial: Commemorates the sacrifice and celebrates the victory of the WWII generation, representing both Atlantic and Pacific theaters. Dedicated May 29, 2004.

World War II Memorial: Commemorates the sacrifice and celebrates the victory of the WWII generation, representing both Atlantic and Pacific theaters. Dedicated May 29, 2004.

 

District of Columbia War Memorial. Dedicated by President Herbert Hoover on Nov. 11, 1931, the memorial commemorates the citizens of District of Columbia that served in WWI.

District of Columbia War Memorial. Dedicated by President Herbert Hoover on Nov. 11, 1931, the memorial commemorates the citizens of District of Columbia that served in WWI.

 

Women in Military Service Memorial at the entrance of Arlington Cemetery. The memorial was dedicated on October 18, 1997 by President William Jefferson Clinton.

Women in Military Service Memorial at the entrance of Arlington Cemetery. The memorial was dedicated on October 18, 1997 by President William Jefferson Clinton.

 

remembrance of the more than 58,000 men and women who died during the Vietnam War or who still remain missing.

Vietnam Veterans, Three Servicemen, Women’s Memorial: Dedicated on Nov.13, 1982, the memorial serves as a remembrance of the more than 58,000 men and women who died during the Vietnam War or who still remain missing.

 

Navy Memorial: Located on Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, the memorial honors those who served or are currently serving in the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and the Merchant Marine. Dedicated on Oct. 13, 1987.

Navy Memorial: Located on Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th Streets, the memorial honors those who served or are currently serving in the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and the Merchant Marine. Dedicated on Oct. 13, 1987.

 

Korean War Veterans Memorial: "Freedom is not Free" remembers the Americans who restored freedom to South Korea between 1950 and 1953. Dedicated on July 27, 1995.

Korean War Veterans Memorial: “Freedom is not Free” remembers the Americans who restored freedom to South Korea between 1950 and 1953. Dedicated on July 27, 1995.

 

The U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial stands as a symbol of the nation's esteem for all Marines who have given their lives in the defense of the United States since 1775. Dedicated in 1954.

The U.S. Marine Corps War Memorial stands as a symbol of the nation’s esteem for all Marines who have given their lives in the defense of the United States since 1775. Dedicated in 1954.

 

Three stainless steel spires ranging in height between 201 feet and 270 feet evoke the image of the contrails from the Air Force Thunderbirds as they perform a precision "bomb burst" maneuver. The memorial was dedicated on October 14, 2006.

Three stainless steel spires ranging in height between 201 feet and 270 feet evoke the image of the contrails from the Air Force Thunderbirds as they perform a precision “bomb burst” maneuver. The memorial was dedicated on October 14, 2006.


Posted: 11 November 2017
About the Author:

Alex di Giovanni has been editing The Torch since August 2006. Prior to joining the Smithsonian, she worked as a writer and editor for the National Geographic Society, Plexus Scientific, The Nature Conservancy, The National Foreign Language Center and St. Martin’s Press, among others. She has the best job in the world.

One Response to “This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave.”
    • JJSchwartz
    • The “home of the brave” to me implies inclusiveness and I just don’t see it when so very few of us make some kind of a contribution. If one looks back at the citizens of the United States during WWII, they all contributed in a significant and meaningful way. The war effort was supported with taxes and bond drives not to mention volunteering for service. I don’t see anything like this but the sacrifice of the very few and their families.

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