May
03

Today in Smithsonian History: May 3, 1968

The National Collection of Fine Arts, now known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum, is located on this side of the Old Patent Office Building at 8th and G Streets, N.W. The National Portrait Gallery is located on the opposite side (not shown in photograph). The Old Patent Office building is a Greek Revival structure, built (1836-66) by Robert Mills and became home to the National Collection of Fine Arts in 1968. In 1980, NCFA was renamed the National Museum of American Art, and then in 2000 it became known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum. (Photographer unknown, via Smithsonian Institution Archives)

The Smithsonian American Art Museum, is located on this side of the Old Patent Office Building at 8th and G Streets, N.W. The National Portrait Gallery is located on the opposite side (not shown in photograph). The Old Patent Office building is a Greek Revival structure, built (1836-66) by Robert Mills and became home to the National Collection of Fine Arts in 1968. In 1980, NCFA was renamed the National Museum of American Art, and then in 2000 it became known as the Smithsonian American Art Museum. (Photographer unknown, via Smithsonian Institution Archives)

May 3, 1968 The National Collection of Fine Arts, now the Smithsonian American Art Museum, is dedicated, having moved from the Natural History Building to the Old Patent Office Building which was vacated by the Civil Service Commission. At the dedication, President and Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson are escorted through the galleries by Secretary and Mrs. S. Dillon Ripley. The public opening is on May 6.

After undergoing an extensive renovation, the Patent Office Building was renamed the Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture in 2006. (Photo courtesy Foster + Partners)

After undergoing an extensive renovation, the Patent Office Building was renamed the Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture in 2006. (Photo by Ken Rahaim)

The renovation of the Reynolds Center included the dramatic and innovative Robert & Arlene Kogod Courtyard. (Photo courtesy Foster + Partners)

The renovation of the Reynolds Center included the dramatic and innovative Robert & Arlene Kogod Courtyard. (Photo courtesy Foster + Partners)


Posted: 3 May 2017
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